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Chemistry Directory 2014

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TENURE-TRACK FACULTY
PHONE (95)
OFFICE
EMAIL
APPLE, Thomas Off:68038 Off:B237A tapple
CAIN, Matthew Off:62705 Off:B321C mfcain
Lab:68417 Lab:B314
CHAIN, William Off:65795 Off:B205B chain
Off:67480 Off:B238A
Lab:65724 Lab:B205
HEAD, John Off:65787 Off:B241A johnh
Lab:67220 Lab:B216
HEMSCHEIDT, Thomas Off:66401 Off:B321B hemschei
Lab:67380 Lab:BA320
JARRETT, Joseph Off:66721 Off:B245 jtj
Lab:64620 Lab:BA302
Lab:64620 Lab:BA304
JENSEN, Craig Off:62769 Off:B309B jensen
Lab:65786 Lab:B302
Lab:65793 Lab:B308
Lab:67389 Lab:B309
Lab:65793 Lab:B313
KAISER, Ralf Off:65731 Off:B301A ralfk
Lab:65730 Lab:B301
KUMASHIRO, Kristin Off:67480 Off:B241
Off:67480 Off:B240
Lab:65726 Lab:B203
NG, Ho Leung Off:62014 Off:B208 hng
Lab:63685 Lab:B208
TIUS, Marcus Off:62779 Off:B321D tius
Lab:69690 Lab:BA416
Lab:63119 Lab:BA417
Lab:65410 Lab:BA419
WILLIAMS, Philip Off:65720 Off:B245A philipwi
Lab:65719 Lab:BA307
EMERITUS FACULTY
PHONE
OFFICE
EMAIL
CRAMER, Roger 65789 B 235 rcramer
IHRIG, Judson BA 209 judson
LIU, Robert 65723 BA 316 rshl
RECHNITZ, Garry 65789 B 235 rechnitz
SEFF, Karl 226-7917 B 235 seff
VISITING FACULTY
PHONE
OFFICE
EMAIL
BRAYTON, Daniel 65793 B 308 dbrayton
FENNER, Amanda 65740 B 247B afenner
MARGOSIAK, Stephen 63207 B 245B sam22
NATAROV, Andrei B 247A natarov
SMITH, Jan 68381 B 241B jgsmith
DEPARTMENTAL OFFICE
PHONE
OFFICE
EMAIL
Departmental Office 67480 B 239 chemdept
Departmental Fiscal 67481 B 238 ryama
Graduate Admissions 65904 B 241A chemgrad
Registration 65904 B 241A chemreg/ chemsumr
STOCKROOMS
PHONE
OFFICE
EMAIL
RESEARCH STOCKROOM 66021 B 115
Cueva, Glorina 68382 B 112 glorina
66021 B 116
INSTRUCTIONAL STOCKROOM 65716 B 214
Kiyabu, Shaun 65716 B 214 kiyabus
NMR LAB
PHONE
OFFICE
EMAIL
NMR LAB 67503 BA 109
Niemczura, Walter 63113 B 120 walt
Yoshida, Wesley 67503 BA 109 wyoshida
FACILITES
PHONE
OFFICE
EMAIL
INSTRUMENT SHOP 68184 B 251
Linzi, John 68184 B 251 jlinzi
GLASSBLOWING SHOP 67768 BA 004
MACHINE SHOP 68117 BA 012
Kawamura, Edwin 63112 BA 002 kawamura
RESEARCHERS
PHONE
OFFICE
EMAIL
Dai, Jingqiu 65719 BA 305 jingqiu
Jones, Brant 65786 B 302 brantmj
Ohgo, Kosuke 65726 B 203 ohgo
GRADUATE AND POST-DOCTORAL STUDENTS
PHONE
LAB
EMAIL
Abplanalp, Matthew 65786 B 303 mja38
Ataie, Niloufar 63685 B 208 nataie
Beaumont, Paul 65793 B 308 paulrb
Congmon, Jonathan 67389 BA 405 jcongmon
Cramer, Julia 64620 BA 304 cramerj
Crandall, Parker 65786 B 302 parkerbc
Dabalos, Chester 65726 B 202 cdabalos
Dangi, Beni 65786 B 304 bdangi
Dickinson, Cody 65410 BA 416 cfd4
Djajamuliadi, Jhonsen 65726 B 203 jhonsen
Egan, Miles 65786 B 302 eganm
Ewalt, John 63685 B 208A ewalt
Fash, David 65724 B 207 dfash
Förstel, Marko 65786 B 304 markof
Gilles, David 67389 BA 405 dgilles
Gurr, Joshua 65719 BA 307 gurrj
He, Jiao 65786 B 303 dgilles
Ho, Thanh 65410 BA 416 hothanh
Holjencin, Charles 64620 BA 303 ceh
Huang, Mian 65719 BA 305 huangmia
Jimenez, Cisco 65726 B 206 jimenez3
Judd, Matthew 64620 BA 304 mrjudd
Kagawa, Allison 63685 B 208A alkagawa
Kitamura, Kei 65410 BA 419 kitam
Landers, Brant 65793 B 309 blanders
Lewis, Robert 65724 B 205 rslewis
Lu, Wenjie (Jessie) 63685 B 208 wenjielu
Maksyutenko, Pavlo 65786 B 302 pavlo
Moon, Daniel 65724 B 206 dmoon42
Morris, Jennifer 64620 BA 302 morrisjb
Nagamine, Jennifer 67220 B 216 janagami
Nagashige, Mika 65723 B 205 mln2
Neupane, Ram 65719 BA 307 neupane
Nguyen, Phuong 65793 B 309 nguyenph
Parker, Dorian 65786 B 303 dparker
Parrish, Stephen 65719 BA 305 parrishs
Sartain, Hope 65793 B 309 sartainh
Sens, Alex 63685 B 208 asens
Shinsato, David 65726 B 203 davidts
Souza, Samson 65410 B 206 sasouza
Squire, Christian 67220 B 216 csquire
Tanabe, Chris 67220 B 216 ct4
Thomas, Aaron 65786 B 302 amthom
Tran, Don 64620 BA 302 dlt28831
Turner, Andrew 65786 B 302 aturner7
Wisthoff, Michael 65723 B 205 mwisthof
Yang, Tao 65786 B 304 yang4763
Zheng, Weifeng 65724 B 207 wz205
Zhou, Zhe 63119 BA 407 zhezhou
NON-CHEMISTRY TEACHING ASSISTANTS
PHONE
LAB
EMAIL
Gaoiran, Romee rwg3
Kiyabu, Shaun kiyabus
Kobayashi, Hiromi   hiromi2
Noguchi, Kiyonari   kiyonari
Sens, Alex     sens
Song, Jessica    
Watson, Stuart     watsons8
NATURAL SCIENCES
PHONE
EMAIL
Ditto, William (Dean) 66451 wditto
Hoffman, Mary (A.O.) 66034 mary40
Nakamura, Gary (F.O.) 65913 garyn
Voong, Linda (Personnel Officer) 65915 voong

IMPORTANT CONTACTS

Campus Security Emerg. (incl. chem. emergency) 66911
Chem. Emergency Direct M-F, 8:00 am – 4:30 pm 63202
MSDS: www.hazard.com
Campus Security Non-Emerg. 68221
Honolulu Police 9-911

FAQs – Graduate Program

Do I have to fill out both the Graduate Division application and the Department of Chemistry application?
Yes.

Can I speak with current graduate students in the program?
We can put you in e-mail contact with one or more of our current graduate students.

Can the application fee be waived?
The application fee cannot be waived. If paying the fee will cause financial hardship, please let us know.

How do I find faculty research interests?
The research interests of the faculty are listed on the Chemistry Department web page. If the information on the web page is insufficient, you should feel free to contact individual faculty members by e-mail to ask for additional information concerning research opportunities in their respective research groups.

Should I talk with a faculty member before I submit my application?
There is no need for you to do so, but if you wish to, you are certainly welcome to.

What should I do if my TOEFL\ IELTS score is too low?
Prepare and take the language examination again and earn a score equal to or better than the minimum before re-applying. The minimum score for the TOEFL is 100 with sub-scores of 25 for Speaking and 25 for Listening. For the IELTS the minimum score is 7.0.

How is the decision to admit a student to the Graduate Program in Chemistry made?
The decision is made on the basis of the grades (minimum GPA 3.0/4.0 = 75%), the recommendation letters and the personal statement. Research experience is also factored into the decision.

What is the average number of applicants usually admitted to the program?
We admit students to the Chemistry Graduate Program in the Fall and in the Spring. The typical size of the Fall entering class varies between 7 and 10, whereas the typical size of the Spr1ng entering class varies between 0 and 3.

Can applications be held from one term to another?
Yes, although the application fee must be paid again.

What is the departmental GRE requirement?
The University of Hawaii no longer requires the GRE for admission into any of the graduate programs, but specific programs do require these scores. The Department of Chemistry is aligned with the University of Hawaii and does not require GRE scores.

When can I expect to hear an answer regarding my application?
Once the application is complete the members of the Graduate Admissions Committee each review it and provide a recommendation to the department chair who is charged with making the decision to admit or not to admit. The recommendation of the Graduate Admissions Committee is typically acted on within one week.

What are the application deadline dates?
The deadlines for U.S. applicants are May 1 for Fall semester admission and September 1 for Spring semester admission. For non-U.S. applicants the respective deadlines are March 1 and August 1. These deadlines are flexible, however, it is advisable to submit your complete application long before the deadline. Applications are reviewed as they are received and offers are made before the deadlines for submission of an application. All the available openings for the entering Graduate class may be filled before the deadline.

How long does the application process take from submission to notification?
There is no way to provide an answer for this question. The admissions process is two-tiered. The Chemistry Department makes the first round of decisions but the University’s Graduate Division is then charged with making the official offers. Since the Chemistry Department has no control over the Graduate Division’s timetable, there is no way to know how long the process will take.

TA\ New Student Questions

How much\ What am I required to teach?
An effort is made to match each individual graduate student’s teaching preferences with the needs of the department. A typical (full) load for a teaching assistant is supervision of two laboratory sections a week, plus grading, examination proctoring and tutoring.

Is a TA considered faculty?
No.

Is there TA training?
Yes. This training takes place during the week before the semester begins.

Are summer stipends available?
Yes. Preference is given to first year graduate students in awarding summer TA-ships.

Are tuition waivers available?
It is Chemistry Department policy to support all members of the entering graduate class with a teaching assistantship that pays a stipend and a full tuition waiver. If a graduate student is subsequently supported through a research assistantship he/she retains the tuition waiver.

Qs not answered
- What are the program admission requirements?
- What makes an ideal applicant?
- What is the average number of applicants usually admitted to the program?
- Do you admit during the Spring semesters, or is admission for Fall only?
- What is the application review process?
- What are the application deadline dates?
- How long does the application process take from submission to notification?

TA\ New Student Questions
- What opportunities are available for summer research or teaching assistantships, and what are the stipends?
- What are my options for temporary housing?


Chemistry Department at UH Manoa

Overview: In line with the University’s commitment to undergraduate and graduate studies, the Department of Chemistry at the University of Hawaii at Manoa has recently begun to expand its facilities. The department currently has 13 permanent (tenured and tenure-track) faculty members, 2 adjunct professors, 21 postdoctoral research fellows, and 8 technical and secretarial staff members. The graduate program has approximately 40 students, of which half are in the Ph.D. program with the remainder working towards their M.S. degree. Typically, there are 120 undergraduates pursuing a B.A. or B.S. in Chemistry at the University of Hawaii at Manoa.

Faculty Interests: The faculty of the Department of Chemistry have research interests in bioinorganic, organic, inorganic, and physical chemistry. The main areas of research in the Organic Chemistry division are bioorganic and natural products chemistry. Particular emphasis is found in two areas, the isolation and identification of antitumor compounds derived from terrestrial and marine organisms and the total synthesis of anticancer agents. The Inorganic Chemistry division focuses on the syntheses and characterization of new materials, such as those for hydrogen storage and catalysis. Physical Chemistry at UH-Manoa includes experimental and theoretical approaches, such as NMR spectroscopy of proteins, reaction dynamics in astrochemistry, combustion chemistry, planetary chemistry and computational studies of the interactions between surfaces and small molecules.

Interdisciplinary Research: The graduate faculty participate in a number of collaborative efforts. Organic chemistry faculty interested in natural products chemistry are part of an integrated drug discovery program with colleagues at the Cancer Research Center of Hawaii. Faculty are involved in other intra- and interdepartmental research programs, such as the hydrogen program of the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute (HNEI), the Cell and Molecular Biology Program, the NASA Astrobiology Institute, and the W.M. Keck Astrochemistry Laboratory.

Faculty members maintain research programs and participate in the graduate education program. Most of the faculty also teach undergraduate courses and direct undergraduate research projects. Individual faculty web pages give more details of the research programs underway. Extramural support for faculty research comes from several federal agencies, including the National Institutes of Health, the National Science Foundation, the Department of the Army, the Department of Energy, NASA, Keck Foundation, and Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Additional support comes from industrial sources and private foundations.

Facilities: The Department has a strong commitment to maintaining state-of-the-art instrumentation. Our instrumentation includes three NMR spectrometers equipped for a wide-range of nuclei: a Varian Mercury Plus 300 for routine solution NMR, a Varian Unity Inova 400 wide-bore for solid-state NMR and, a Varian Unity Inova 500 for advanced multidimensional and/or multinuclear experiments. Departmental staff provide training for graduate and post-doctoral students. A strong testimony to their skill and experience is the frequency with which research groups outside of UH submit samples for analysis. The department maintains a machine shop, electronics shop, and glassblowing services.

A short walk from Bilger Hall is Hamilton Library. This library houses a large collection of books and subscribes to all major chemical and biochemical periodicals. Members of the Chemistry Department enjoy extensive access, and computerized literature searching is available, using databases such as Chemical Abstracts, Science Citation Index, and Engineering Index.


Research Opportunites

All chemistry majors at the University of Hawai’i are strongly encouraged to do research as part of their degree program. This entails doing a chemistry project in one of the department’s research laboratories.

As an undergraduate, there are several reasons why it is good to spend some time doing research…

Perhaps the most important reason is that you encounter real chemical problems to which you can apply the knowledge you have learned in your formal chemistry classes.

  • You also get to experience what it is like to work in a research lab.
  • You get to know individual faculty, and interact with their graduate students and other researchers in the lab.
  • Undergraduate research experience looks good on a resume and makes you a more attractive candidate for graduate school or for finding a job when you graduate.
  • A chemistry B.S. major at UH can count up to 3 credits of Chem 399 towards his/her degree requirements.

There are several ways to pick a research adviser:

  • One approach is to look at the different research areas listed on the UH chemistry department web pages and identify a research area which interests you.
  • Alternatively, go talk to a chemistry student adviser (Profs. Head or Kumashiro) and depending on your interests, they will advise you on which faculty members you might interview.

After identifying one or more research areas, go and visit the appropriate faculty members and tell them you are interested in doing undergraduate research. Don’t be shy because most faculty members will offer you encouragement especially once they know that you are interested in doing some research.


Graduate Program

PHOTO

Programs: The Department of Chemistry offers programs leading to the M.S. and Ph.D. degrees. Research opportunities are available in a wide-range of contemporary areas of chemistry, including organic, inorganic, bioinorganic, physical, and analytical chemistry. Information about potential research projects are discussed on individual faculty homepages.

Degree Requirements

For all graduate students, the first two semesters are spent mainly on coursework. An individualized program of study is planned for each student that is based on his or her interests, as well as his/her performance on a series of qualifying examinations taken before the first semester. Each student is encouraged to choose a thesis advisor during the first semester and to begin research. Specific Chemistry Department requirements are outlined in Requirements for the M.S. and Ph.D. Degrees in Chemistry and general Graduate Degree requirements for the University of Hawaii at Manoa can be found at the Graduate Division Website

Student Learning Outcomes PhD Program

The program aims to develop scientists able to perform independent research with moderate supervision in a subdiscipline of chemistry and to present the research results orally and in writing to an audience of peers. The extent to which this goal is reached is assessed with the following SLO’s:

a) progress reports to the student’s committee;

b) completion of 18 credits of advanced course work;

c) presentation of background for research project and of research results in an open forum;

d) publication of research results in peer reviewed journals.

Student Learning Outcomes MS Program

The program aims to develop scientists able to perform independent research with moderate supervision in a subdiscipline of chemistry and to present the research results orally and in writing to an audience of peers. The extent to which this goal is reached is assessed with the following SLO’s:

a) progress reports to the student’s committee;

b) completion of 18 credits of advanced course work;

c) presentation of background for research project and of research results in an open forum;

d) publication of research results in peer reviewed journals.


Marcus A. Tius

Marcus A. Tius

Educational Background

Marcus A. Tius received his B.A. degree in 1975 from Dartmouth College (mathematics and chemistry) and his Ph.D. degree in 1980 from Harvard University. He joined the faculty of the University of Hawaii in 1980 where his research interests are in the areas of total synthesis and the development of new synthetic methods.

Research Interests

Organic synthesis has marked impressive advances during the past few decades. Sensitive new analytical techniques have had a large role in bringing this about, particularly the developments in NMR. Problems that arise during the execution of a total synthesis very often suggest areas in which existing methodology is deficient. This, in turn, creates a challenge and an opportunity to address the deficiency by developing new methodology.

In the broader discussion of organic synthesis, a feature that often gets scant attention is the practicality of the work. While it may be true that extraordinarily complex structures are amenable to assembly through synthesis, success may require truly heroic effort, and vast material and human resources for the production of modest quantities of material. Whereas this approach to the science may have been adequate in the past, in the future the issue of practicality will have to be addressed. This is especially true for materials with useful pharmacological properties that are not available through fermentation, and are therefore scarce. While organic synthesis is capable of producing complex natural products, these may be produced in quantities sufficient only for spectroscopic characterization. If the problem is to produce gram quantities of a material of molecular weight ca. 1000, there are two approaches that can be followed. The first is to treat this as a logistical problem, and to organize the efforts of a large team; the second approach is to redefine the way one thinks about problem solving in organic synthesis and to devise an approach which can be implemented by a small team. In our research we have attempted to follow this second approach.