Workshops & Events

Descriptions

For more information about the content of the workshops/events, contact Yao Hill, 956-4283, or Monica Stitt-Bergh, 956-6669

 

Spring 2015 workshops have not been scheduled yet.

 


Previous Workshops


Map Your Program Student Learning Outcomes to Institutional Learning Objectives

The Faculty Senate approved undergraduate institutional learning objectives in 2012. On this year's annual assessment report, undergraduate programs are asked to indicate how their program student learning outcomes (SLOs) are aligned with Institutional Learning Objectives (ILOs). This short workshop will help undergraduate programs complete the new question on the annual assessment report that asks them to check the program SLOs that are directly related to each ILO. Please bring a laptop/tablet to access your program's online report during this hands-on workshop.

Note: for undergraduate degree programs only

Level: Beginner
Format: Interactive, individualized guidance
Date/time:

  • Tuesday, 9/16/2014, 2:00-2:45 PM
  • Friday, 9/19/2014, 1:00-1:45 PM
  • Wednesday, 9/24/2014, 2:00-2:45 PM
  • Thursday, 9/25/2014, 2:30-3:15 PM

  • Tuesday, 9/30/2014, 9:00-9:45 AM
  • Friday, 10/3/2014, 11:30 AM -12:15 PM
Location: KUY 106 small conference room


Program Assessment of Learning: Examples of what it is and is not

Program assessment of learning, individual student evaluation, grading, student satisfaction, graduation and retention, employment tracking--how are they different? What does good program assessment of learning look like? Over the years, UH Mānoa has seen increased motivation among faculty to use different assessment tools to improve their curriculum and program. External reporting requirements mean that faculty need to be versed in assessment more than ever. Through a presentation and case analysis activities, participants will learn about good program learning assessment practices and understand how it is different from other forms of assessment and evaluation.


Level: Beginner
Format: Presentation + interactive activities
Date/time/location:
Tuesday, February 11, 2014, 1:00 pm - 2:15 pm, KUY 106
OR
Wednesday, February 12, 2014, 2:30 pm - 3:45 pm, KUY 106

Take the Next Step in Program Learning Assessment: Collect & Review Evidence of Learning

Bring your program student learning outcomes and leave with a plan to assess how well students are meeting those outcomes! The facilitator will share good practices for collecting and reviewing evidence of student learning, tips, and examples. During the workshop, attendees will have the opportunity to consider various options and discuss which might work best for their program given its size, resources, and assessment goals.

By the end of the workshop, attendees will

  • Be able to list different ways to collect and review evidence of learning;
  • Be able to describe benefits and drawbacks for the different ways; and
  • Have at least one meaningful and manageable plan for their own program.

Level: Beginner
Format: Lecture + activity
Date/time/location:
Thursday, February 27, 2014, 2:30 - 3:45 pm, KUY 106
OR
Monday, March 3, 2014, 10:30am - 11:45pm, KUY 106

Developing Learning-Assessment Surveys

While satisfaction surveys and end-of-course evaluations (e.g., eCAFE) are important and provide useful information, they do not help faculty and programs understand what students learned and why. This workshop introduces attendees to survey questions that reveal respondents’ perceptions of learning, and it provides information on using survey results to guide program development.

Workshop outcomes: Attendees will be able to

  • State the purpose of satisfaction surveys and learning-assessment surveys;
  • Differentiate between questions that investigate student learning and satisfaction;
  • Describe how survey results can be used to guide program development; and
  • List strategies to increase survey response rates.
Level: Beginner
Format: Lecture + hands-on practice
Date/time/location:
Friday, March 7, 2014, 1:30 - 2:45pm, KUY 106
OR
Tuesday, March 11, 2014, 9:00 - 10:15am, KUY 106

Assessing Learning in Graduate Programs

The goal of this workshop is to support improvement of graduate program assessment of student learning and help participants develop assessment strategies that best fit their program context. The facilitator will showcase assessment strategies and provide tools and resources. Participants will have ample time to reflect, brainstorm with colleagues, draft assessment plans, and take back resources for plan implementation. Through demonstration and interactive activities, the participants will be able to:

  • Identify characteristics of best practices in graduate program assessment of learning outcomes;
  • Evaluate the need for resources and faculty engagement; and
  • Draft a feasible learning assessment plan.

The facilitator will provide active follow-up support to all participants after the workshop. The participants are expected to bring a copy of their program student learning outcomes to the workshop. Most programs’ outcomes can be found in the Annual Assessment Reports: https://manoa.hawaii.edu/assessment/update2/view.php

Seat limit: 8 per session
Level: Beginning
Format: Presentation + interactive activities
Date/time/location:
Friday, March 14, 10:00 am - 11:30 am, KUY106
or
Tuesday, March 18, 10:30 am - 12:00 pm, KUY 106

Using Rubrics in Program Assessment

Do you have questions about how to use rubrics in program assessment? In this workshop, participants will learn about

  • finding good examples of rubrics to adapt or adopt;
  • working with faculty colleagues to modify a rubric;
  • helping multiple faculty members use the same rubric to evaluate student work;
  • dealing with results.
Through a presentation and small group exercises, the participants will learn the resources and techniques related to collaborative adaptation of rubrics, rater training, inter-rater consistency check, and presenting rubric results.

Level: Beginner to intermediate
Format: Demonstration + interactive activities
Date/time/location: Tuesday, Oct 15, 2013, 10:30 am - 12:00 pm, KUY 106

Facilitating Program Assessment Decision-Making

Program assessment is necessarily a collaborative activity. Assessment coordinators and curriculum committee chairs are often asked to lead faculty groups in that collaborative process. This workshop introduces several basic facilitation techniques to help workshop attendees lead a collaborative meeting. The facilitator will use the development of a curriculum map as an example to illustrate the facilitation techniques and tips. Participants will be able to volunteer to lead the facilitation.

Workshop attendees will leave knowing
  • Tips for a facilitating a collaborative meeting
  • How to collaboratively develop a curriculum map
This workshop is designed for assessment coordinators and curriculum committee chairs but others involved with assessment are welcome.

Level: Beginner
Format: Demonstration + facilitation activities
Date/time/location: Friday, Oct 11, 2013, 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm, QLC 208

Making Sense of Assessment Data

What should a program do after assessment data collection (e.g., after administering a test, after evaluating using a rubric, after receiving questionnaires)? This workshop talks about how to use meaningful questions to guide data analysis. It offers practical techniques to summarize and synthesize assessment data that are numeric and text-based. With hands-on exercises and small group discussions, the participants will be able to apply different data summarization techniques to turn raw data into meaningful information.

Level: Beginner
Format: Presentation + interactive activities
Date/time/location:
Friday, Sep 27, 2013, 1:30 pm - 3:00 pm, QLC 208
or
Thursday, Oct 3, 2013, 9:00 am - 10:30 am, QLC 208

Bring an Assessment Challenge – Facilitated table conversations about program assessment of student learning

Get advice on your assessment challenges from colleagues, Assessment Office faculty specialists, and Mānoa Assessment Committee members. Come ready to pose your assessment questions and also ready to make suggestions to others. We’ll facilitate table discussions and provide individualized consultations. You can bring learning outcomes, curriculum map, annual assessment report draft, etc., for more concrete suggestions.

Examples of assessment challenges you might bring to the table:

  • How can I encourage faculty colleagues to participate in assessment?
  • How should I answer the questions on the annual assessment report?
  • We have learning outcomes and a curriculum map now. What is the next step?
  • What kinds of evidence should we collect from students?
  • Level: Beginner to Advanced
    Format: Facilitated table conversations
    Date/time/location:
    Wednesday, Sep 25, 2013, 2:30 pm - 3:30 pm, KUY106
    or
    Monday, Oct 7, 2013, 10:30 am - 11:30 am, KUY106

    Assessing Student Learning Outcomes with Theses and Dissertations – Going Beyond Completion Rates

    Graduate programs have great advantages in student learning outcomes (SLO) assessment because they have ready access to many types of evidence of student achievement, namely, scholarly paper, thesis, dissertation, qualifying or comprehensive exam, and/or oral defense. However, only counting the number of students who completed each of these achievements is not sufficient in SLO assessment. This workshop will provide tools, illustrate process, and showcase best practices in using graduate students’ achievement work (e.g., theses, dissertations) to assess SLOs. This workshop is also applicable to undergraduate programs that require a thesis for degree completion. Participants will have the opportunity to practice creating assessment tools in small groups. In this workshop, you will learn

    • how to construct rubrics that can be used to evaluate theses and dissertations;
    • how to plan the process of using theses/dissertations in SLO assessment;
    • how thesis/dissertation evaluation can be integrated into regular graduation process.

    Level: Beginner
    Format: Demonstration + small group exercise
    Date/time/location: Friday, March 15, 2013, 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm, KUY106

    Using Program Assessment Results to Improve Student Learning

    Just as students’ performance in and evaluations of a course can help professors improve their individual classes, aggregated information on program-level student performance can be used to improve student learning in the degree program. In this workshop, the facilitator will discuss how faculty members can use program-level assessment results for program improvement. After listening to a short presentation, attendees will review examples of assessment results and discuss how programs could act upon the results to improve the program. Attendees will leave knowing

    • specific ways to use assessment results (e.g., changes to curriculum, assessment procedures, program policies);
    • how to interpret results; and
    • strategies to help faculty act on results.

    Level: Advanced beginner
    Format: Interactive with a small group activity
    Date/time/location: Friday, March 8, 2013, 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm, KUY106

    How Good is Your Multiple-Choice Test? Find Out by Using Item Analysis

    Many multiple-choice tests can be improved to better measure student learning. A test question can be referred to as an item. Through item analysis, you can see whether each test question (item) matches the level of the learning that you expect of the students. Item analysis helps you examine which learning outcomes are better achieved than others. It also helps you catch misbehaving questions: those with wrong answer keys, those with more than one answer, those not relevant to your teaching objectives, and those that confuse your students. In this workshop, you will learn

    • the basic concepts: item difficulty, difference index, B-index, distractor analysis;
    • how to conduct item analysis using formulas in Excel;
    • item analysis in pre- and post-test scenarios and achievement test scenarios; and
    • how to interpret item analysis results.

    Level: Beginner (basic Excel skills needed for optimal learning)
    Format: Demonstration + hands-on practice
    Requirement: Please bring a laptop with Microsoft Excel installed
    Date/time/location: Friday, March 1, 2013, 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm, KUY106

    Best Practices for Planning Program-Level Assessment of Student Learning

    Save time, increase quality, and improve the likelihood of successful program learning assessment with a good assessment plan.  Assessing what students have learned in the major or graduate program requires participation of faculty and students and coordination of activities. A good assessment plan can ensure faculty and students are involved, meaningful tasks are undertaken, and the results are useful to the program. In this workshop, attendees will learn

    • components of an assessment plan;
    • strategies to involve faculty and students in assessment;
    • tips for managing the workload; and
    • approaches that help programs carry out the plan.

    Level: Beginner
    Format: Lecture + question and answer
    Date/time/location: Friday, February 22, 2013, 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm, KUY106

    Using Excel's Pivot Table to Analyze Learning-Assessment Data

    Are there quick and easy ways to check data accuracy, summarize data, and present data? Yes! Excel's Pivot Table can help. Pivot table reports and charts can help organize large sets of data, observe patterns and trends in seconds, and graphically communicate findings to your colleagues and students. In this workshop, the presenter will demonstrate how to create and modify pivot tables and pivot charts to organize, summarize, and present data in meaningful ways. The presenter's examples and hands-on practice will involve program learning-assessment data. The participants are expected to learn how to

    • set up pivot tables;
    • alter pivot table data;
    • sort tables and create filters;
    • format pivot tables for effective presentations; and
    • create pivot charts.

    Level: Beginner (basic Excel skills needed for optimal learning)
    Format: Demonstration + hand-on practice
    Requirement: Please bring a laptop with Microsoft Excel installed (Version 2007 and 2010 are preferred)
    Date/time/location: Wednesday, February 13, 2013, 1:30 pm - 2:45 pm, KUY106

    What's Good Enough? Setting Standards

    100 is a good score. Or is it? A score of 100 doesn't mean anything on its own. Standards provide the context or comparison that give a score meaning. They help us interpret assessment results and figure out how the results can be used to improve teaching and learning. In this workshop, you will learn how to

    • choose an appropriate kind of standard and
    • set specific performance standards.

    Level: Intermediate
    Format: Lecture + small group activity
    Date/time/location: Tuesday, November 13, 2012, 12:30 -1:45 pm, KUY106

    NOTE: This workshop was last offered in April 2012.

    Basic Techniques in Using Excel to Analyze Assessment Data

    What do you do after you collect valuable feedback and information on student learning outcomes through questionnaires, quizzes, and/or rubrics? This workshop will share basic and useful techniques to organize, clean, and analyze data using Microsoft Excel.
    In this workshop you will learn basic techniques to

    • Enter data into Excel
    • Check for data-entry errors
    • Summarize questionnaire data, test scores, and rubric ratings using formulas and charts/tables

    Level: Beginner
    Format: Demonstration + hands-on practice
    Requirement: Please bring a laptop with Microsoft Excel installed (Version 2007 and 2010 are preferred)

    Date/time/location: Thursday, November 15, 2012, 1:00-2:15, KUY 106

    Analyzing Open-Ended Survey Responses – Where to start?

    By Yao Zhang Hill, Ph.D.

    Open-ended survey questions are great tools for us to understand the whats, whys, and hows of our program and student learning. But what should we do when facing pages and pages of comments? This workshop will provide a step-by-step guide in tackling open-ended survey response analysis. The facilitator will also share tips on sharing and using the results. During the workshop, the participants will have the opportunity to practice conducting the analysis in small groups.

    In this workshop you will learn:

    1. how to carry out a preliminary analysis of open-ended survey responses
    2. how to report the analysis results
    3. ways that the results can be used

    Level: Beginner
    Format: Lecture + small group activity
    Date/time/location: Friday, September 14, 2012, 2:00-3:00pm, KUY 106

    Using Surveys for Understanding and Improving University Educational Programs

    By John McE. Davis, PhD

    Surveys are often the first method we think of to collect data for outcomes assessment and program evaluation purposes, yet the development and use of good surveys may be less straightforward than presumed. This workshop provides advice on using surveys in university departments/programs, focusing on assessment project planning, survey development, and administration. The overall goal of the workshop is to help faculty develop and administer quality surveys that produce useful information for various program development aims. A key idea emphasized during the workshop is that careful consideration of assessment uses throughout a survey project increases the likelihood that results will be used toward meaningful program understanding and/or improvement.

    By participating in the workshop, attendees will be able to . . .

    • understand that useful assessment issues from specified assessment purposes/aims (in the form of assessment questions and assessment uses);
    • identify surveys as an appropriate data collection/assessment tool (given assessment questions and uses);
    • draft useful survey items (i.e., high-quality items that collect information related to assessment questions and that enable assessment uses);
    • understand that stated uses of assessment should inform planning, development, and implementation of survey assessment methods.

    Date/time/location: Friday, August 31, 2012, 2:00-3:00 pm, KUY106

    What's Good Enough? Setting Benchmarks/Standards

    100 is a good score. Or is it? A score of 100 doesn't mean anything on its own. Benchmarks/standards provide the context or comparison that gives a score
     meaning. They help us interpret assessment results and figure out how the results can be used to improve teaching and learning.

    In this workshop, you will learn how to

    • Choose an appropriate kind of standard or benchmark
    • Set specific performance standards/benchmarks

    Level: Intermediate
    Format: Lecture + small group activity
    Date/time/location: Friday, April 27, 2012, 10:30 –11:45 am, KUY106

    Oral Communication and Program-level Assessment

    Oral presentations can tell a program many things about students’ disciplinary knowledge and their ability to communicate orally. This workshop will share oral communication rubrics and provide planning and logistics advice.

    In this workshop you will learn how to

    • Ensure the oral presentations are aligned to program learning outcomes
    • Coordinate collection of results from multiple instructors
    • Aggregate and present results
    • Use results to celebrate student learning and/or modify the program

    Level: Intermediate
    Format: Lecture + small group activity
    Date/time/location: Wednesday, April 25, 2012, 2:00 –3:15 pm, KUY106

    Designing Effective Surveys
    [examples will be from academic programs]

    Surveys are an efficient means of getting feedback from students, alumni, employers, and other stakeholders. This workshop will introduce you to the basics of survey design, from planning to question construction and layout. The facilitators will provide practical tips to help you avoid common survey design mistakes.

    In this workshop you will learn

    • What information is needed to get started
    • How to construct good survey questions
    • How to organize and lay out a survey

    Level: Beginner
    Format: Lecture + small group activity
    Date/time/location: Friday, April 13, 2012, 10:30 –11:45 am, KUY106

    Designing Effective Surveys
    [examples will be from co-curricular programs]

    Surveys are an efficient means of getting feedback from students, alumni, employers, and other stakeholders. This workshop will introduce you to the basics of survey design, from planning to question construction and layout. The facilitators will provide practical tips to help you avoid common survey design mistakes.

    In this workshop you will learn

    • What information is needed to get started
    • How to construct good survey questions
    • How to organize and lay out a survey

    Level: Beginner
    Format: Lecture + small group activity
    Date/time/location: Monday, April 9, 2012, 2:00 –3:15 pm, KUY106

    Using "Signature" or "Key" Assignments for Program-Level Assessment

    “Signature” or “key” assignments can tell a program many things about students’ disciplinary knowledge and their skills in thinking, analysis, information literacy, and communicating. Programs can use the results from assessing assignments to guide program development.

    In this workshop you will learn how to

    • Create a signature or key assignment that is aligned with program learning outcomes
    • Collect student work from multiple course sections and/or instructors
    • Use results to help students improve their skills and content knowledge

    Level: Intermediate
    Format: Lecture
    Date/time/location: Friday, March 23, 2012, 10:30 –11:45 pm, KUY106

    Data, Now What?

    Your program collected data, now what? You don’t need complicated statistics and flying bubble charts to shed light on your outcomes. This workshop introduces basic methods of summarizing data and provides tips on effectively sharing results so your program can engage in meaningful conversation.

    Who should attend: Faculty & staff who are planning to collect data or have already collected data
    Level: Beginner
    Format: Lecture
    Date/time/location: Thursday, December 15, 2011, 10:30 –11:45 am, KUY106

    Meaningful Program Assessment

    Program assessment can help programs recognize ways in which they can improve, particularly in student learning. A good way to keep sight of assessment’s purpose is to concentrate assessment activities on meaningful issues and important concerns.
    Attendees will learn and practice techniques to

    • identify meaningful assessment projects;
    • address program concerns by exploring uses of assessment results.

    Who should attend: Faculty interested in program assessment, program assessment coordinators
    Level: A basic understanding of program assessment will be helpful
    Format: Interactive
    Date/time/location: Wednesday, December 14, 2011, 10:30 –11:45 am, KUY106

    Curriculum Map: An Elegant & Powerful Tool in Your Assessment Toolbox

    Curriculum Map: A graphical illustration of the relationship between a program’s courses/requirements and the program’s student learning outcomes.

    Join us and see how a curriculum map can

    • reveal the contribution of individual courses to the goals of the program;
    • identify courses in which students demonstrate mastery of specific learning outcomes;
    • serve as a useful advising tool.

    You will learn how to create a curriculum map and how curriculum maps can support assessment.

    Who should attend: Faculty members whose programs have student learning outcomes
    Level: Beginner
    Format: Lecture & small group discussion
    Date/time/location: Tuesday, December 13, 2011, 10:30 –11:45 am, KUY106

    24: Program Assessment in 24 Hours/Year

    Useful program assessment in 24 hours a year is possible. Attendees will leave with several blueprints that will help them move their program through the assessment cycle.

    Who should attend: Faculty involved with program assessment, program assessment coordinators
    Level: A basic understanding of program assessment will be helpful
    Format: Lecture plus Q&A
    Date/time/location: Monday, December 12, 2011, 10:30 –11:45 am, KUY106

    Focus Group, Interview, or Survey: Which is Right for Your Co-Curricular Program?

    Is your program thinking about conducting focus groups, interviews, or surveys to better understand students’, alumni’s, employers’ perceptions of the program?  This workshop will describe the purpose, strengths, and weaknesses of each data collection method.  The facilitators will walk you through a decision-making process to help you decide which method best suits your co-curricular program’s assessment goals and resources.

    This workshop is non-technical and will not address how to conduct focus groups, develop interview protocols, design surveys, etc.

    Who should attend: Faculty & staff in co-curricular/special programs
    Level: Introduction
    Format: Lecture + individual activity
    Date/time/location: Thursday, May 19, 2011, 1:30 – 2:45 pm, HAW 309

    Increasing Faculty Involvement in Program Assessment

    Many hands make light work is one reason why faculty members should be involved with program assessment. But more importantly, faculty members are the best people to assess and improve their programs. Faculty involvement is vital.  Join us and learn how assessment champions and coordinators can increase faculty colleagues’ participation in program assessment. The facilitators will provide a framework, based on program factors, to identify effective strategies. Participants will have time during the workshop to identify strategies suited to their programs.

    Who should attend: Faculty & staff
    Level: Introduction
    Format: Lecture + individual activity
    Date/time/location: Thursday, April 26, 2011, 1:30 – 2:45 pm, HAW 309

    Focus Group, Interview, or Survey: Which is Right for Your Academic Program?

    Is your program thinking about conducting focus groups, interviews, or surveys to better understand students’, alumni’s, or employers’ perceptions of learning?  Through examples, this workshop will describe the purpose, strengths, and weaknesses of each data collection method.  The facilitators will take you through a decision-making process to help you decide which method best suits your program’s assessment goals and resources.

    This workshop is non-technical and will not address how to conduct focus groups, develop interview protocols, design survey questions, etc. A similar workshop for co-curricular programs will be held on May 19, 2011.

    Who should attend: Faculty & staff in academic programs
    Level: Beginner
    Format: Lecture
    Date/time/location: Thursday, April 21, 2011, 1:30 – 2:45 pm, HAW 309

    Make The Most of Your Curriculum Map

    Curriculum Map: A graphical illustration of the relationship between a program’s courses/requirements and the program’s student learning outcomes.

    Most of us use our program’s curriculum map to determine how frequently students are exposed to the program’s learning outcomes.  But do you know you can use your program’s curriculum map to help design a syllabus?  And to guide departmental course scheduling?  Learn how individuals and programs can use this powerful tool to increase program cohesiveness.

    Who should attend: Faculty & staff
    Level: Beginner/Intermediate
    Format: Lecture
    Date/time/location: Thursday, March 17, 2011, 1:30 – 2:45 pm, HAW 309

    Graduate Program Assessment: From Student- to Program-level Assessment

    Student-level assessment is built into the graduate program sequence.  Using an example, the presenters will guide participants through a graduate-level program assessment plan that is based on evaluation of individual students. Participants will learn how to extract assessment data from student evaluations such as oral exams, dissertation defense, etc., and how to analyze the data so that results can lead to program evolution.

    Who should attend: Graduate faculty & staff
    Level: Introduction
    Format: Lecture + individual activity
    Date/time/location: Tuesday, March 8, 2011, 1:30 – 2:45 pm, HAW 309

    How to Use a Rubric for Program Assessment

    Does your program already have a rubric? Are you having difficulty using it for program assessment? This workshop can take you to the next level. The presenters will discuss

    • how to use a rubric for program assessment, and
    • how to help multiple readers consistently apply the rubric.

    Who should attend: Faculty & staff
    Level: Intermediate
    Format: Interactive Workshop
    Date/time/location: Thursday, December 16, 2010, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm, KUY 106

    How to Use Course Assignments/Exams for Program Assessment

    By using existing course assignments and exams, programs can efficiently assess student achievement on program-level outcomes. Participants will learn how students’ coursework/exam results can do “double-duty”—that is, contribute to course grades and to program assessment. Presenters will guide participants from start to finish using an example and describe decisions made along the way.

    Who should attend: Faculty & staff
    Level: Intermediate
    Format: Interactive Workshop
    Date/time/location: Wednesday, December 15, 2010, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm, KUY 106

    Student Surveys: Perceptions of Achievement

    Surveying students on how well they believe they met program learning outcomes can be useful. The presenters will take participants through a step-by-step procedure to create surveys about student learning outcomes, discuss how to use results, and share tips on good survey practices.

    Participants are encouraged to bring their program student learning outcomes to the workshop.

    Who should attend: Faculty & staff
    Level: Intermediate
    Format: Interactive Workshop
    Date/time/location: Tuesday, December 14, 2010, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm, KUY 106

    From Conversations to Systematic Program Assessment

    Many professors discuss students’ learning in faculty meetings, after oral exams, during dissertation committee meetings, etc. At this workshop, participants will learn how to document conversations and use them as evidence in program assessment. The presenters will give useful techniques specifically for graduate and small undergraduate programs.

    Who should attend: Faculty & staff in graduate programs and small undergraduate programs
    Level: Intermediate
    Format: Interactive Workshop
    Date/time/location: Monday, December 13, 2010, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm, KUY 106

    Using Assessment Results: Closing the Loop

    Assessing student learning only makes sense if the program uses  the assessment results. Otherwise, assessment is an empty exercise. Workshop participants will read short case studies and discuss how programs can or should use results to improve student learning and program effectiveness. The workshop facilitators will give tips and hints on designing program assessments so results are easier to use.

    Who should attend: Faculty & Staff
    Level: Intermediate
    Format: Interactive Workshop
    Date/time/location: Thursday, May 13, 2010, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm, KUY 106

    Collecting Evidence of Student Learning

    When it comes to ways to collect evidence of student learning, there are many options. This workshop will introduce you to common evidence collection methods used in program assessment: exams, portfolios, surveys, interviews, and more. It will also provide a decision-making process to help you choose a method that leads to credible, useful, and actionable information.

    This workshop is non-technical and will not address how to write survey questions, design a test, etc.

    Who should attend: Faculty & Staff
    Level: Beginner
    Format: Interactive Workshop
    Date/time/location: Wednesday, May 12, 2010, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm, KUY 106

    [This workshop was last offered April 21 & 22, 2009]

    Course Learning Outcomes: Creating & Aligning

    The Mānoa Faculty Senate has discussed student learning outcomes several times this year. This workshop will answer FAQs such as these: What are course-level student learning outcomes? Why should a course have them? Can course learning outcomes be the same as the program learning outcomes? Does each course have to address all of the program learning outcomes? It will also provide hints and tips for creating course outcomes that align with the program’s learning outcomes.

    Who should attend: Faculty & Staff
    Level: Beginner
    Format: Interactive Workshop
    Date/time/location: Tuesday, May 11, 2010, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm, KUY 106

    Efficient Program Assessment

    Program assessment does not require developing new exams or assignments. Efficient assessment uses existing student artifacts and current classroom assignments, which seamlessly integrates program assessment with what already happens in key courses in the program’s curriculum. This workshop provides strategies to identify and use existing artifacts and discusses the benefits of using assignments from a capstone experience.

    Who should attend: Faculty & Staff
    Level: Adv Beginner
    Format: Interactive Workshop
    Date/time/location: Monday, May 10, 2010, 11:00 am - 12:15 pm, KUY 106

    Curriculum Mapping for Graduate Programs

    Curriculum Map: A graphical illustration of the relationship between a program's courses/requirements and the program's student learning outcomes. A tool for collaboration and communication.

    Many UHM departments have found that a curriculum map is a straightforward and powerful tool to analyze program cohesiveness. The curriculum mapping process encourages faculty discussion about teaching and learning.

    This workshop will explain how to develop a graduate program curriculum map, including strategies for programs that tailor requirements to individual students. At the end of the workshop, you will be able to develop a curriculum map. For your convenience, this workshop is offered twice.

    Who should attend: Faculty & Staff
    Level: Beginner
    Format: Interactive Workshop
    Date/Time/Location: Thursday, April 8, 2010, 10:30 - 11: 30 am, HAW 309
    Date/Time/Location: Friday, April 16, 2010, 2:30 - 3:30 pm, HAW 309 (repeat of previous week)

    Techniques for Using Rubrics in Program Assessment

    By Dr. Dannelle D. Stevens

    Does your program have learning outcomes (SLOs) related to critical thinking, problem solving, oral communication, written communication, research, or a different complex skill? To assess these SLOs, many programs collect student work: projects, presentations, portfolios, research reports, etc. A rubric is an appropriate and useful tool to evaluate student work and determine how well students achieved the SLOs. Rubrics provide information about strengths and weaknesses that can be used for program improvement. Join us for this workshop and learn how rubrics can be used in program-level assessment

    Bring your program outcomes to the workshop.

    Workshop Facilitator: Dr. Dannelle D. Stevens, professor of Curriculum and Instruction at Portland State University and co-author of the book Introduction to Rubrics: An Assessment Tool To Save Grading Time, Convey Effective Feedback and Promote Student Learning

    Who should attend: assessment coordinators, assessment committee members, curriculum committee members
    Level: Intermediate
    Date/time/location: Tuesday, January 12, 2010, 3:00 pm-4:15 pm, KUY 106

    Program-level Assessment: What is it? Who does it?

    Come to this workshop for a big-picture perspective on program-level assessment. The facilitators will use a UHM assessment report to illustrate the “assessment cycle,” and they will explain the various roles and responsibilities associated with student learning assessment.

    Who should attend: Faculty & Staff
    Level: Beginner
    Format: Presentation/workshop
    Date/time/location: Monday, December 14, 2009, 10:00 am-11:15 am, KUY 106

    An Introduction to Learning Outcomes

    Are you curious about what learning outcomes are and how they can enhance student learning? Are you responsible for creating your program’s learning outcomes? At the end of this workshop you will be able to explain the role of learning outcomes and write good ones.

    Who should attend: Faculty & Staff
    Level: Beginner
    Format: Interactive workshop
    Date/time/location: Tuesday, December 15, 2009, 10:00 am-11:15 am, KUY 106

    Exit Interviews: Student Perception and Achievement

    by Dan Jenkins, PhD, PE
    Can exit interviews be used to collect direct evidence of student learning? Yes! Learn how Biological Engineering (BE) uses an exit interview to gauge student achievement and student perceptions of the program. Dr. Jenkins will share how BE successfully uses this assessment tool to collect information for program improvement.

    Who should attend: Faculty & Staff
    Level: Beginner
    Format: Example of assessment on campus plus question & answer
    Date/time/location: Tuesday, December 15, 2009, 2:00 pm-2:45 pm, KUY 106

    An Introduction to Curriculum Maps

    Do your students understand your program’s curriculum? Learn how to develop a cohesive curriculum by using a curriculum map. At the end of this workshop, you will be able to explain the role of a curriculum map and develop one.

    Who should attend: Faculty & Staff
    Level: Beginner
    Format: Interactive workshop
    Date/time/location: Wednesday, December 16, 2009, 10:00 am-11:15 am, KUY 106

    Alumni and Employer Surveys for Program Improvement

    By Violet Horvath, PhD
    Does your program want to conduct alumni and employer surveys? For the last 2 years, the Myron B. Thompson School of Social Work has used alumni and employer surveys to assess student learning outcomes. Dr. Horvath will share insights on how to implement such surveys and how results can be used.

    Who should attend: Faculty & Staff
    Level: Beginner
    Format: Example of assessment on campus plus question & answer
    Date/time/location: Wednesday, December 16, 2009, 2:00 pm-2:45 pm, KUY 106

    Creating an Assessment Plan & Using Assessment Templates

    Have you been asked to create your program’s assessment plan or been appointed the assessment coordinator for your program? This workshop will introduce you to two planning tools available to help you create a meaningful, actionable, and sustainable assessment plan.

    Who should attend: Faculty & Staff
    Level: Intermediate
    Date/time/location: Thursday, December 17, 2009, 10:00 am-11:15 am, KUY 106

    Capstone Experience to Assess Knowledge and Skills

    By Henrieta Dulaiova, PhD
    The Geology & Geophysics capstone experience prepares majors to be better scientists, and it provides the program with information about students’ content knowledge and oral communication skills. Dr. Dulaiova will describe the capstone and discuss its effect on the program.

    Who should attend: Faculty & Staff
    Level: Beginner
    Format: Example of assessment on campus plus question & answer
    Date/time/location: Thursday, December 17, 2009, 2:00 pm-2:45 pm, KUY 106

    Designing a Syllabus to Promote Student Learning

    A student’s first impression of a course is often formed by looking at the course syllabus. A well-designed syllabus can facilitate student learning by explaining:

    • what you want students to learn;
    • how the assignments will help them meet your expectations; and
    • how they will be evaluated.

    This workshop will help you design an effective, learning-centered syllabus that encourages students to take responsibility for their own learning. The workshop leaders will recommend steps to create a syllabus and describe the elements of a successful syllabus. Participants will have time to interact and begin drafting/revising a syllabus.
    Bring a copy of a syllabus that you’d like to revise or a copy of a course description/outline.

    Date/time/location: Tuesday, November 3, 2009, 12:00 noon-1:15 pm, KUY 106

    Faculty Perspectives on Assessment (panel format)

    Panelists: Roger Babcock (Civil & Environmental Engineering); Erica Clayton (English); Violet Harada (Library & Information Science); Amy Schiffner (Theatre & Dance)

    Join us to garner assessment ideas and advice from experienced colleagues. The panelists will provide examples of UHM program-level assessment activities, share knowledge, and reveal how programs tailor assessment to fit their needs and resources. Panel members, representing a variety of disciplines, will comment on the challenges and benefits of assessment or share best practices and advice. There will be time for discussion and interaction.

    Date/Time: Tuesday, February 10, 2009, 11:30 am -12:45 pm

    Examples of Program-level Assessment

    Program-level assessment of student learning seems daunting. This workshop will demystify assessment through examples of program-level assessment. In the process, common myths will be addressed, the “assessment loop” will be visualized, and assessment plans will be revealed. Also, you will find out about assessment resources available to you.

    This workshop is an introductory workshop designed for faculty and staff looking for a “big picture” perspective on program-level assessment.

    Date/Time: Tuesday, February 24, 2009, 11:30 am -12:45 pm
    [This workshop was last offered on October 8 & 9, 2008]

    Learning Outcomes & Curriculum Maps

    Are you curious about what learning outcomes are and why they are now required for all courses and degrees? Have you been asked to create a “curriculum map” for your major or degree? You are not alone! Get tips on how to write effective learning outcomes. Learn what a curriculum map can reveal and how it is used in program-level assessment.

    This workshop is an introductory tour of the what, why, and how of learning outcomes and curriculum maps designed for faculty and staff in the beginning stages of program-level assessment of student learning.

    Date/Time: Tuesday, March 31, 2009, 11:30 pm -12:45 pm
    [This workshop was last offered on October 14 & 15, 2008]

    Collecting Assessment Data

    When it comes to ways to collect assessment data, the sky is the limit! This is both liberating and challenging. This workshop will introduce you to various data-collection methods to assess student learning and student perceptions. The focus will be on a decision-making process that leads to a method(s) that can shed light on how well students are meeting your program outcomes.

    This workshop is an introduction to selecting appropriate data-collection methods and is non-technical (e.g., this workshop will not address how to write survey questions, design a survey, or determine the reliability of a test).

    Date/Time
    For your convenience, this workshop is offered twice:
    Tuesday, April 21, 2009, 11:30 am -12:45 pm
    Wednesday, April 22, 2009, 11:30 am – 12:45 pm

    updated 11/20/2014